You can’t always rely on the consumables that an electronic typewriter uses as proof of that typewriter’s origins …

… any more than you can always rely on what’s written on the rear badge …

In this instance, however, the presence of a Nakajima ribbon cassette reveals the identity of the manufacturer.

True, this typewriter was “Made in Japan”, but not by Casio …

Its unpacking instructions reference the Nakajima AX-60 (non-LCD) and AX-65 (LCD) portable electronic typewriter …

More specifically, its Spelling Check Operating Instructions (English and French) has a footer which references the AX-65 only (since a Spelling Check is not available for its non-LCD counterpart) …

Nakajima AX-65

I like the look and the typing feel of this “Casio” machine, but I do have misgivings about the durability of the plastics used for the outer shell and the key tops.

A typewriter which has better-quality plastics is the sturdier and more business-like Nakajima AX-240

… like my Olivetti Praxis 20, this AX-240 is a non-functioning wedge that I can’t (yet) bear to part with …

Oh to be able to transplant the healthy organs of the CW-600 inside the body of the AX-240 (instead I had to settle for transplanting the ribbon cassette from the AX-240) …

Despite its cheaper plastic, the Casio CW-600 is not unattractive. I particularly like the previous owner’s stickers …

The red “Wheel Engineering”sticker is appropriate for a daisy wheel appliance …

… and the Norfolk Island sticker perhaps reveals a little of the previous owner’s travel history …

The typing feel is good, it’s also quiet. This is a machine that’s hardly been used.

The inside of the machine is clean and the serial number sticker looks like it was put there yesterday …

Not bad for $20 AUD.

I’ll add a link to the full Casiowriter CW-600 (Nakajima AX-65) instruction guide in due course.

No excuse for you not to go out and get one …