Meet the Olympia Compact S (KompaktSchreibmaschine) as introduced in a previous post:

An electronic office typewriter that was very hard to find, until now …

Close inspection provides evidence of a quality build …

When the serial number is not a stick-on label, it’s a good sign …

The platen knob and the keyboard offer what I referred to in my last post as the last vestiges of “that Olympia look” …

Circa November 1984 and now in its mid-thirties, this electronic wedge is mellowing (not yellowing”) with age.

Not yellowing, because that subtle two-tone combination of cream and beige is a deliberate design choice – as seen here on Mastertype and Startype machines of the same ‘Office Line” era …

“Old school electronics” you might call them (or “ETs” as they were referred to in the early 1980s (using an acronym more successfully popularized by Speilberg)).

So how does this “old school E.T.” fare?

The typing feel is pleasant enough without being outstanding (tactile, not whisper quiet, not overly noisy either).

For some reason (most likely cost) the elaborate “Whisperdisc” cassette wheel of the ES/ESW series has been replaced with a different cassette wheel:

Olympia Whisperdisc (above)

While I’m willing to accept that the Compact S is able to achieve a top speed of 14 cps (the speed claimed in its technical specification) to me it feels as if the average speed is more like 12.

For a “Compact” machine, the ‘S’ does not quite live up to its “semi-professional” status – although it does takes a professional-sized ribbon cassette …

There’s a covered slot on the rear of the machine, where a Centronics port ought to be …

… also confirmation that this typewriter was Made in Germany, but was it inspired by the Japanese-made and equally scalloped Electronic Compact?

More questions than I have answers (no instruction guide as yet.)

I have a lot of typewriter ephemera that could be traded, should you happen to have an instruction guide or a print wheel?

Two-sides of the same phonecard – two sides of the collecting spectrum …

It strikes me the Compact S was as much a combination of old and new as this phonecard is. Both now rendered obsolete, of course, by newer technology.